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20121001
20121031
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WBAL (NBC) 5
KCSM (PBS) 4
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 4
WTTG (FOX) 4
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 20, 2012 4:00pm PDT
the beautiful city of prague. today, it's the capital of a democratic state, but for more than 40 years...prague was under the thumb of moscow. because of the communist influence, one would expect that there would be a monument here to lenin. there is. but not to thlenin, one of the founders of communism, but to lennon, one of the founders of the beatles. the people of prague call it "the lennon wall." it's covered with graffiti honoring the singer. >> i think it's neat how the city almost encourages it, 'cause in the united states, graffiti is more of a -- it's kind of looked at as not an art form. but in prague, all over the city, it's accepted as an art, which i think is interesting. >> graffiti has a special place in the hearts of people here. under communism, speaking out against government was forbidden, so graffiti was a form of political protest. when john lennon was killed in 1980, young people again turned to graffiti. to them, lennon stood for peace and artistic freedom. writing on the wall helped them express their sadness over his death as well as their own yearning t
NBC
Oct 27, 2012 1:00pm EDT
tv. nicole shows us how a famous, old city in europe ushers in the new year. [ classical music plays ] >> vienna is the capital of austria. nicknamed the "city of music," mozart, beethoven, strauss, and many others composed and performed here. so it's no surprise that when it comes to ringing in the new year, vienna does it with music. lots of music. in fact, new year's eve here is a giant, traveling party called silvesterpfad. that means "the new year's trail." instead of being jammed into a single location like new york's times square, in vienna, the celebration takes place all over town, and it starts early. [ merengue music plays ] if you like the latin beat, there's music from the dominican republic called merengue. the name comes from meringue, a dessert made from whipped egg whites. apparently, people thought the dancers looked like human egg beaters. beats me. [ indistinct conversations ] >> these people are learning to do the waltz -- vienna's gift to the world. [ crowd shouts ] as day turns into evening, the lights get brighter, and the crowds get bigger. it seems like the
NBC
Oct 6, 2012 1:00pm EDT
that's the idea behind chess in the schools. the organization uses chess to motivate inner-city students to do better in class. >> it helps you because you learn how to take time to think, and some students need that. >> i usually like to rush into things and try to pretty much go right into things. but i've learned to, like, take my time, think about what's going on, and really just focus around what's happening around me. >> chess requires you to plan several moves in advance to consider what your opponent might be doing next. >> exactly -- he's doing the same thing white's doing. it's -- it helps with math, problem-solving, critical-thinking skills. you can apply that to any subject. >> what the kids learn in class they get to take with them to tournaments held all over the country. >> we've had elementary-school students win the sections in high-school nationals. and the young ones seem to get it right away, and they go very fast with it -- and far. >> juan grew up with chess in the schools. now he's the chess coordinator at east side community high school. >> i remember being a part
NBC
Oct 14, 2012 12:30pm EDT
no coincidence that the queen became the most powerful piece on the board. nowadays, the game is experiencing a renaissance among american teens. in some new york city schools, chess has become more than just a game -- it's a teaching tool. >> they learn to concentrate better, to focus better. they learn to make good choices. >> and that's the idea behind chess in the schools. the organization uses chess to motivate inner-city students to do better in class. >> it helps you because you learn how to take time to think, and some students need that. >> i usually like to rush into things and try to pretty much go right into things. but i've learned to, like, take my time, think about what's going on, and really just focus around what's happening around me. >> chess requires you to plan several moves in advance to consider what your opponent might be doing next. >> exactly -- he's doing the same thing white's doing. it's -- it helps with math, problem-solving, critical-thinking skills. you can apply that to any subject. >> what the kids learn in class they get to take with them to tou
PBS
Oct 6, 2012 4:00pm PDT
call this the "sweet smell of success." >> during ancient times, two cities grew up on opposite sides of the mighty danube river in central europe. nicole tells us how a storm helped change history. >> budapest is the capital of hungary, but it wasn't always one city. the river danube divided buda and pest until a terrible storm led to the building of a bridge. the story goes that count széchenyi's father fell ill here on the pest side. the count was on the other side of the river, the buda side. by the time the count got across by boat, his father had died. he had even missed his father's funeral. the count took on the task of raising money for this bridge to be built so people would always be able to cross the river. called the "chain bridge," because its cables look like bicycle chains, it was completed in the mid-1800s. a few years later, the cities of buda and pest were officially united, and for good measure, they threw in a third neighboring city -- obuda. it has been budapest ever since. some say the first king here was attila the hun, hence the name "hungary." others s
FOX
Oct 20, 2012 9:00am EDT
schools and small private ones, in cities and in the rural areas, in high school, middle school, even elementary school. >> i think that they should teach the kids that it's not good to maybe touch each other inappropriately in the hallways and say inappropriate things. >> and it's not just at school. one in three students say they've been harassed through a text, e-mail, or facebook. >> i was in high school and really open about my sexuality, and then people had a problem with that. but then, you know, they were bullying me online. >> when you're harassed electronically through social media, it can be devastating. it doesn't end at the end of the school day. it continues on into the evenings. it seems like it's everywhere. it can seem like it's everybody. >> surprisingly, a lot of teens admit they harass others. some say it's no big deal or it's funny, but it's not. >> it can make them feel sick to their stomach. they can have trouble going to school. they may have trouble concentrating on their school work and may not even want to go to school. >> sadly, only half the students who w
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)